David Lynch’s Mulholland drive
"Wilkins, if that damned dog craps in the courtyard one more time, I’m just gonna bake his little butt for breakfast!"

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I meant to edit this, not repost it. Oh well, since someone’s already liked it, I guess it can stay.

David Lynch’s Mulholland drive

"Wilkins, if that damned dog craps in the courtyard one more time, I’m just gonna bake his little butt for breakfast!"

=======

I meant to edit this, not repost it. Oh well, since someone’s already liked it, I guess it can stay.

David Lynch: We Care About New York. Public service announcement created to bring attention to the city’s rat problem.

Christ. I dropped an apple core ten years ago, I’m going back for it.

Diane, 11:30 AM, February 24th, entering the town of Twin Peaks.

Today is an important day in history (thanks, whiskeyandgoatsmilk.)

realreason:

Diane, 11:30 AM, February 24th, entering the town of Twin Peaks.

Today is an important day in history (thanks, whiskeyandgoatsmilk.)

realreason:

(Source: whiskeyandgoatsmilk, via fuckyeahdavidlynch)

Crossfade …
Review: Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992), directed by David Lynch
I am not sure I even feel qualified to review Twin Peaks, Fire Walk With Me or otherwise. It explores some of the Black Lodge mythos of the TV series, and gives some backstory of Laura’s descent from nice hometown girl to the wreck that was murdered by (spoiler) her father while possessed of an entity named Bob, who actually wanted to take her over instead. It adds new characters, and ties the whole series of murders to a larger history.
Lynch, however, would rather things be more opaque rather than more clear. The film is dream-like, even the ordinary slice-of-life bits Lynch always includes as contrast (Blue Velvet, for example, opened with that montage of Lumberton as a wholesome, American town).
I dunno. Frankly, I am just going to heat up some garmonbozia and eat it with butter and pepper, and go on thinking of the works of David Lynch as a mystery it is fun to pursue, but which can never be solved.
This is Scix in the Back Row, slurping garmonbozia.

Crossfade …

Review: Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992), directed by David Lynch

I am not sure I even feel qualified to review Twin Peaks, Fire Walk With Me or otherwise. It explores some of the Black Lodge mythos of the TV series, and gives some backstory of Laura’s descent from nice hometown girl to the wreck that was murdered by (spoiler) her father while possessed of an entity named Bob, who actually wanted to take her over instead. It adds new characters, and ties the whole series of murders to a larger history.

Lynch, however, would rather things be more opaque rather than more clear. The film is dream-like, even the ordinary slice-of-life bits Lynch always includes as contrast (Blue Velvet, for example, opened with that montage of Lumberton as a wholesome, American town).

I dunno. Frankly, I am just going to heat up some garmonbozia and eat it with butter and pepper, and go on thinking of the works of David Lynch as a mystery it is fun to pursue, but which can never be solved.

This is Scix in the Back Row, slurping garmonbozia.

WTF MONKEY!
Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992), directed by David Lynch

WTF MONKEY!

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992), directed by David Lynch

"I want all my … garmonbozia."

In one vision, The Man From Another Place (Michael J. Anderson) identifies himself: “I am the arm.”

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992), directed by David Lynch

Bob and doomed Leland.
Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992), directed by David Lynch

Bob and doomed Leland.

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992), directed by David Lynch

Leland possessed.
Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992), directed by David Lynch

Leland possessed.

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992), directed by David Lynch

"Let’s get lost together."

"Open your eyes, James. You don’t even know me. There are things about me… Even Donna doesn’t know me. Your Laura disappeared."

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992), directed by David Lynch

How to Speak German. I wonder why this book, in particular. Is it a clue? Lynch’s Mise en scène is a bit … sporadic. Everything is meaningful, as with Kubrick films, but he also improvises on the spot. This could well have been something the actress was reading at the time, and he decided it “fit” in some esoteric way.
Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992), directed by David Lynch

How to Speak German. I wonder why this book, in particular. Is it a clue? Lynch’s Mise en scène is a bit … sporadic. Everything is meaningful, as with Kubrick films, but he also improvises on the spot. This could well have been something the actress was reading at the time, and he decided it “fit” in some esoteric way.

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992), directed by David Lynch

The ring.

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992), directed by David Lynch

"You stole the corn! It’s your father! It’s him!"

By “corn” he means garmonbozia: “doesn’t it look just like creamed corn?” Bob kept the garmonbozia from Mike (the one-armed man); garmonbozia is something like the residue of suffering in humans. Bob was supposed to share it. As I recall. It’s a complex mythos.

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992), directed by David Lynch

(NSFW: boobies!)

"Here we go again."

"Oh, shit!"

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992), directed by David Lynch

"Hey, the party twins! My high school sandwich. Let’s put some meat inside."

Oh, you silver-tongued devil.

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992), directed by David Lynch