"Oh, God! Oh Jesus Christ!"


The Wicker Man (1973) directed by Robin Hardy, written by Anthony Shaffer. Starring Edward Woodward, Christopher Lee, Diane Cilento, Ingrid Pitt, and Britt Ekland.

"Hear ye the words of the Lord! Awake, ye heathens, and hold!" Preaching before the pyre.


The Wicker Man (1973) directed by Robin Hardy, written by Anthony Shaffer. Starring Edward Woodward, Christopher Lee, Diane Cilento, Ingrid Pitt, and Britt Ekland.

Dancing ‘round the Man (animated gif)
The Wicker Man (1973) directed by Robin Hardy,  written by Anthony Shaffer. Starring Edward Woodward, Christopher Lee,  Diane Cilento, Ingrid Pitt, and Britt Ekland.

Dancing ‘round the Man (animated gif)


The Wicker Man (1973) directed by Robin Hardy, written by Anthony Shaffer. Starring Edward Woodward, Christopher Lee, Diane Cilento, Ingrid Pitt, and Britt Ekland.

"Sing Cuckoo!"
Review: The Wicker Man (1973)
When I first saw this film, I was actually a practicing neo-Pagan, and I rather liked the quaint paganism of Summerisle. It wasn’t peopled with Goth witches or Hollywood-pretty worshipers, but regular folks, butchers and bakers and teachers and chemists and clerks. While Sgt Howie clearly found the culture of Summerisle disturbing and even menacing, I thrilled to his discomfiture.
And yet I really didn’t want to see him burned. Yikes. PR fail for neo-Paganism, I thought.
Of course, it was never a neo-Pagan PR campaign. It was a horror film. The casual Paganism of Summerisle was quaint, at first, but insular, and wary of strangers, much like the village of Innsmouth in H.P. Lovecraft’s The Shadow over Innsmouth (and others). Still, rather than be horrified, I still watch the film mostly as Sgt Howie being a dick.
The movie has quite a cult following, and has received awards and acclaim as an exceptional horror film. Why? What about this admittedly low-budget film attracts such ardor? Christopher Lee, himself, loved the project so much he did the role of Lord Summerisle for free, and used his fame to promote the film. There were some hurdles to jump through, but finally the viewer can see the film more-or-less as Hardy originally intended it, uncut and undoctored as it was when first released.
So what makes it exceptional? I think its earnestness is what separates it from the pack of its contemporaries. Each actor, even the minor villagers in the background, believes in their role, in the made-up culture that Hardy and Shaffer created. In some way, they made it real. They were humorous and amorous and frivolous in their way, but deep down connected to their village, their land, and their crops. This is what I feel was most missing from The Wicker Tree (2010), the not-sequel they made with a pair of Texas evangelicals serving as the protagonist-victims.
And don’t get me started on the travesty that Nicolas Cage helped bring into the world. If there is a Lovecraftian horror so vile and unnatural as to cause a base, atavistic terror in the lizard brain of modern man, it is the existence of that film. So let us agree that it never happened.
This is Scix, shouting “BEEES!” in the back row.
The Wicker Man (1973) directed by Robin Hardy, written by Anthony Shaffer. Starring Edward Woodward, Christopher Lee, Diane Cilento, Ingrid Pitt, and Britt Ekland.

"Sing Cuckoo!"

Review: The Wicker Man (1973)

When I first saw this film, I was actually a practicing neo-Pagan, and I rather liked the quaint paganism of Summerisle. It wasn’t peopled with Goth witches or Hollywood-pretty worshipers, but regular folks, butchers and bakers and teachers and chemists and clerks. While Sgt Howie clearly found the culture of Summerisle disturbing and even menacing, I thrilled to his discomfiture.

And yet I really didn’t want to see him burned. Yikes. PR fail for neo-Paganism, I thought.

Of course, it was never a neo-Pagan PR campaign. It was a horror film. The casual Paganism of Summerisle was quaint, at first, but insular, and wary of strangers, much like the village of Innsmouth in H.P. Lovecraft’s The Shadow over Innsmouth (and others). Still, rather than be horrified, I still watch the film mostly as Sgt Howie being a dick.

The movie has quite a cult following, and has received awards and acclaim as an exceptional horror film. Why? What about this admittedly low-budget film attracts such ardor? Christopher Lee, himself, loved the project so much he did the role of Lord Summerisle for free, and used his fame to promote the film. There were some hurdles to jump through, but finally the viewer can see the film more-or-less as Hardy originally intended it, uncut and undoctored as it was when first released.

So what makes it exceptional? I think its earnestness is what separates it from the pack of its contemporaries. Each actor, even the minor villagers in the background, believes in their role, in the made-up culture that Hardy and Shaffer created. In some way, they made it real. They were humorous and amorous and frivolous in their way, but deep down connected to their village, their land, and their crops. This is what I feel was most missing from The Wicker Tree (2010), the not-sequel they made with a pair of Texas evangelicals serving as the protagonist-victims.

And don’t get me started on the travesty that Nicolas Cage helped bring into the world. If there is a Lovecraftian horror so vile and unnatural as to cause a base, atavistic terror in the lizard brain of modern man, it is the existence of that film. So let us agree that it never happened.

This is Scix, shouting “BEEES!” in the back row.


The Wicker Man (1973) directed by Robin Hardy, written by Anthony Shaffer. Starring Edward Woodward, Christopher Lee, Diane Cilento, Ingrid Pitt, and Britt Ekland.

justcallmezed:

estosinesoaquello:

The Wicker Man - Robin Hardy, 1973

Why can’t I have enough privacy in my yard to do things like this?  I should plant more trees this year.

“They do love their divinity lessons.”
“But they - they are - are naked!”
“Naturally. It’s much too dangerous to jump through the fire with your clothes on.”
======
See also: 
First of May, first of May,
Outdoor fucking starts today….

justcallmezed:

estosinesoaquello:

The Wicker Man - Robin Hardy, 1973

Why can’t I have enough privacy in my yard to do things like this?  I should plant more trees this year.

“They do love their divinity lessons.”

“But they - they are - are naked!”

“Naturally. It’s much too dangerous to jump through the fire with your clothes on.”

======

See also:

First of May, first of May,

Outdoor fucking starts today….

A Muppet Wicker Man….

Happy May Day.

justcallmezed:

I’m feeling a strong desire to rewatch The Wicker Man (1973, of course, not the Nic Cage abomination).  I had no idea there was a cover of Willow’s song, nor that it was so stunningly beautiful.

Sneaker Pimps: How Do