spookypuke:

the-overlook-hotel:

"Overlook Hotel" socks from Sockaholic, inspired by The Shining

UHMMM

or a bit over $9.00 US
Cheaper than the jacket or the shower curtain.

spookypuke:

the-overlook-hotel:

"Overlook Hotel" socks from Sockaholic, inspired by The Shining

UHMMM

or a bit over $9.00 US

Cheaper than the jacket or the shower curtain.

(via trudymade)

the-overlook-hotel:

Twice in The Shining, Danny is seen watching watching cartoons on television: at the beginning of the movie during his first scene at the Denver, Colorado apartment, and then much later, while in a catatonic state following his assault in Room 237.

The soundtrack Kubrick used was comprised of audio clips taken from the 1970’s theme song for The Road Runner Show, as well as a Warner Bros. cartoon called Stop! Look! and Hasten! The clips were rearranged to sit nicely against the dialogue, as well as offer ironic counterpoint — as in the melody that accompanies Wendy’s final line in the apartment scene: “Well, let’s just wait and see. We’re all gonna have a real good time…”

the-overlook-hotel:

A deleted scene from an early screenplay for The Shining, dated February 4, 1978. In this scene, Jack finds a scrapbook which chronicles the Overlook Hotel’s sordid history. Jack becomes obsessed with the scrapbook, then shares his discovery with Wendy.

The scrapbook, which figures prominently in Stephen King’s novel, was all but removed in the final cut of the film. However, many scenes involving the scrapbook were filmed but not used, including this scene from a later draft.

(Many thanks to David Winter for sharing this screenplay. His grandfather, Derek Winter, was a manager at Stansted Airport, which was used as the location for Dick Hallorann’s phone call to Larry Durkin. The screenplay was given to him by Kubrick so he could read the story and approve the use of the airport as a location.)

the-overlook-hotel:

In the first scene with Danny and Wendy at their Denver, Colorado apartment, a toy laser pistol can be seen lying on the table. This prop is the last remnant of an early idea director Stanley Kubrick had for The Shining.

These pages from a recently uncovered draft of the screenplay from 1978 offer a glimpse into this abandoned idea.

The first page, dated 3/20/78, contains an unused beginning of the lunchtime scene — it was either never filmed, or removed during editing. Kubrick’s hand-written note reads “We see on the table alongside him his space laser gun which will always be with him”.

On the second page, dated 2/4/78, Kubrick describes the final showdown in the maze. The action had yet to be fully worked out, although he does have Jack getting trapped in the maze and freezing to death. Danny, however, does not walk backwards in his own footsteps to cunningly elude Jack. Instead, he uses an implement to systematically smash all the lights in the maze, plunging it into darkness as he follows his own tracks back out of the maze.

In a subsequent draft, Kubrick has Danny using the above mentioned toy laser gun, which is shown to have a flashlight built into it, to light his way out of the dark maze.

The second page also offers a glimpse into an earlier version of the ending, where Dick Hallorann is not killed by Jack, but instead shows up to save Danny and Wendy — an ending which is more closely aligned with Stephen King’s novel. Earlier treatments had Wendy killing Jack with a knife, and when Hallorann shows up at the hotel, it’s revealed that he’s been called to the Overlook to do the hotel’s bidding; he’s intent on finishing the job of killing Wendy and Danny.

Interestingly, Danny is referred to as “Tony” in the screenplay for the last third of the story, after he becomes catatonic following his encounter with the woman in Room 237. 

(Many thanks to David Winter for sharing this screenplay. His grandfather, Derek Winter, was a manager at Stansted Airport, which was used as the location for Dick Hallorann’s phone call to Larry Durkin. The screenplay was given to him by Kubrick so he could read the story and approve the use of the airport as a location.)

afistfulofculture:

Whoa: “All Work and No Play Sport Coat”

I want one SO BADLY!

afistfulofculture:

Whoa: “All Work and No Play Sport Coat

I want one SO BADLY!

(via trudymade)

goodbyetoallthis:

Picture on top: Malcolm McDowell being held by Darth Vader (circa 1970-1971).
Picture on bottom: Malcolm McDowell conversing with Darth Vader (circa 1913). 

goodbyetoallthis:

Picture on top: Malcolm McDowell being held by Darth Vader (circa 1970-1971).

Picture on bottom: Malcolm McDowell conversing with Darth Vader (circa 1913). 

(Source: goodbyetoallthat, via stanley-kubrick-cinema)

(Source: bewareofthenatives)

scixual:

"You’ve never been a liar, George, you don’t have enough imagination to lie."
The Killing (1956) directed by Stanley Kubrick, based on the novel Clean Break by Lionel White. Starring Sterling Hayden, Coleen Gray, Vince Edwards and Elisha Cook Jr.

scixual:

"You’ve never been a liar, George, you don’t have enough imagination to lie."

The Killing (1956) directed by Stanley Kubrick, based on the novel Clean Break by Lionel White. Starring Sterling Hayden, Coleen Gray, Vince Edwards and Elisha Cook Jr.

scixual:

"I don’t want to go there." (animated gif) Tony and Danny’s finger creeped me out when I first saw this. It’s not quite how King wrote it, though. Still, I think it was a good choice.
With no context, this could be a useful macro.
Edit to add: I recently learned that the finger was Danny Lloyd’s idea — at his audition. One of those things that works, but I can’t quite understand how.
The Shining (1980) directed by Stanley Kubrick, starring Jack Nicholson, Shelley Duvall, and Danny Lloyd. Based on the novel by Stephen King.

scixual:

"I don’t want to go there." (animated gif) Tony and Danny’s finger creeped me out when I first saw this. It’s not quite how King wrote it, though. Still, I think it was a good choice.

With no context, this could be a useful macro.

Edit to add: I recently learned that the finger was Danny Lloyd’s idea — at his audition. One of those things that works, but I can’t quite understand how.


The Shining (1980) directed by Stanley Kubrick, starring Jack Nicholson, Shelley Duvall, and Danny Lloyd. Based on the novel by Stephen King.

iznogoodgood:

"It’s amazing how fast you get used to such a big place. I tell you, when we first came up here I thought it was kinda scary."

These shots all convey bigness of space. Kubrick’s known for the two-point perspective shot.

(Source: strangewood, via cinecity)

David Lynch’s Blue Velvet and Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining are definitely the two films I hold in highest regard — both for a high level of crafting and for an evocativeness that is unparalleled.

I feel like there must exist a third film somewhere that mates them somehow. I must find it or make it.

 

?

cinephilearchive:

This is a collection of rare color photographs from one of the classics of modern cinema, Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. These photos also include a glimpse of the infamous 'pie-fight' finale that was excised from the film prior to release. Though I am not positive, some of these photos may have been taken by the well-known photographer from the era, Weegee, as he was present during the pie-fight sequence. The photos were accumulated from the following sources: Kubrick by Michel Ciment (2001 edition); Stanley Kubrick Filmographie Complète (Taschen, 2003); Stanley Kubrick Archives (Taschen 1st ed.).

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb screenplay by Stanley Kubrick, Terry Southern and Peter George [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

Inside: ‘Dr. Strangelove or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb’ (2000), a behind-the-scenes documentary about the making of one of the classics of modern cinema. Including interviews with many members of the cast and crew of this story about the scramble by the heads of state to head off a rogue general’s attempt to launch a nuclear war, this film gives fans a wealth of new information on the work and effort that went into bringing the film to fruition.

(Source: cinephilearchive, via cinecity)

I often feel like this.

(Source: chrisevansed, via cinecity)

the-overlook-hotel:

Filming Jack Nicholson’s iconic “Here’s Johnny!” moment on the set of The Shining.

The camera has been heavily protected from Jack’s axe and the debris which resulted from hacking open the door.

Nicholson provided his own personal axe-wielding expertise as a former volunteer fireman, however, he did not improvise the “Here’s Johnny!” line as has often been claimed — It was scripted.

(via techsgtjenn)