thegoddamnwerewolf:

doronjosama:

Happy V-Day everyone! “Bitchin’ in the Kitchen” from Shock Treatment, 1981. Cliff DeYoung and Jessica Harper, with bonus Rik Mayall & Barry Humphries.

also, here’s Jessica Harper singing. She’s pretty good at it

I and about seven people seriously love this film.

Richard O’Brien and Patricia Quinn, Lady Stephens in Shock Treatment and Rocky Horror Picture Show

I can’t help thinking: how awkward would it be to be Richard O’Brien’s real-life sister after watching two movies featuring incestual brother-sister pairs?

(Source: 2fast4luv, via thegoddamnwerewolf)

slack-of-all-trades:

I have complex feelings about Rocky Horror. I love the movie, and my history with it was largely empowering as a queer, not-entirely-masculine young person.
I recently read an article critiquing the fact that the fandom seems to have become a place to make gay jokes — ie, it’s a queer film, but the fandom is largely straight, “goofing” at being gender non-conforming for a laugh.
Not everywhere, obviously, not everyone, but it is a trend I have seen.
Because the audience has permission to do callbacks and shout-ats, it also allows some terrible jokes. We always used to call ourselves “equal opportunity insulters,” but we never picked on the underdogs. We were more like court jesters, mocking the rulers.
But increasingly, I am seeing some downright homophobic, misogynist, racist bullshit becoming increasingly the norm in the audience and the cast.  I don’t like it. It’s not the spirit of the film, it’s not the spirit of the community that grew up around the lifesaver that it had become.
I fell in love with Rocky Horror because it was a movie and a community and a subculture I felt was open, accepting and inviting for me and people like me, who didn’t really fit in Out There. But now I feel re-marginalized. And if I call anyone out on it, I am told I have no sense of humor, it’s just a joke, I don’t really “get it” if I am being so uptight.
Dammit, I’ve been part of Rocky Horror since 1987. Before a lot of the current fans were born. I “get it,” thank you very much.
Where I saw freedom to exist, you saw freedom to make shitty jokes that are “politically incorrect” (oh, how I loathe that phrase).
Oh, well. Things are better, overall.
But it still hurts that my extended family uses me as a joke now. It may be a while before I go back again.
Where are all the queers that have, over the years, stopped going, I wonder? Is there another subcultural phenomenon that they’ve been flocking to while I was stocking up on cheap fishnets and black lipstick and nail polish?
—Scix

slack-of-all-trades:

I have complex feelings about Rocky Horror. I love the movie, and my history with it was largely empowering as a queer, not-entirely-masculine young person.

I recently read an article critiquing the fact that the fandom seems to have become a place to make gay jokes — ie, it’s a queer film, but the fandom is largely straight, “goofing” at being gender non-conforming for a laugh.

Not everywhere, obviously, not everyone, but it is a trend I have seen.

Because the audience has permission to do callbacks and shout-ats, it also allows some terrible jokes. We always used to call ourselves “equal opportunity insulters,” but we never picked on the underdogs. We were more like court jesters, mocking the rulers.

But increasingly, I am seeing some downright homophobic, misogynist, racist bullshit becoming increasingly the norm in the audience and the cast.  I don’t like it. It’s not the spirit of the film, it’s not the spirit of the community that grew up around the lifesaver that it had become.

I fell in love with Rocky Horror because it was a movie and a community and a subculture I felt was open, accepting and inviting for me and people like me, who didn’t really fit in Out There. But now I feel re-marginalized. And if I call anyone out on it, I am told I have no sense of humor, it’s just a joke, I don’t really “get it” if I am being so uptight.

Dammit, I’ve been part of Rocky Horror since 1987. Before a lot of the current fans were born. I “get it,” thank you very much.

Where I saw freedom to exist, you saw freedom to make shitty jokes that are “politically incorrect” (oh, how I loathe that phrase).

Oh, well. Things are better, overall.

But it still hurts that my extended family uses me as a joke now. It may be a while before I go back again.

Where are all the queers that have, over the years, stopped going, I wonder? Is there another subcultural phenomenon that they’ve been flocking to while I was stocking up on cheap fishnets and black lipstick and nail polish?

—Scix

Shock Treatment (1981) —  Not a sequel, not a prequel, but an EQUAL.

A lot of Rocky fans hated it. I love it at least as much as Rocky Horror.

Shock Treatment (1981) — Not a sequel, not a prequel, but an EQUAL.

A lot of Rocky fans hated it. I love it at least as much as Rocky Horror.

(Source: horrorhostmagazine)

serpens:

poisonivygore:

Lesser Known Posters:

Suspiria(1977)

… Has anyone ever tried watching Suspiria but replacing the audio track with Shock Treatment’s? >_> (or vice-versa) I’ve never done it, but I get the feeling the results would somehow be spectacular.

I can only endorse this experiment.

(Source: abatida)

therockyhuntershow:

It was 40 years ago today. A little rock n’ roll musical written by out-of-work actor, Richard O’Brien, premiered at the 63-seat theatre, The Royal Court Theatre upstairs. Young actors Tim Curry, Julie Covington, Chris Malcom, Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, Rayner Bourton, Nell Campbell & Paddy O’Hagan made up the original cast. 15 months later, filming began for the film version of the hit musical which would become the longest running theatrical release of all time and the greatest and most well known cult film in history.

Can we get this to 1973 notes?

Happy birthday, Rocky!

(via techsgtjenn)

Richard O’Brien, ladies and gentles.
neil-gaiman:

amandapalmer:

just got this from rocky horror creator (+riff raff!) mr. richard o’brien. this is him being awarded an honorary doctorate from the waikato institute of technology a few weeks ago, in new zealand.
let’s just stop for a moment and talk about this….i mean…
HOW FUCKING AWESOME IS THIS MAN?
 
 

He really is.

Richard O’Brien, ladies and gentles.

neil-gaiman:

amandapalmer:

just got this from rocky horror creator (+riff raff!) mr. richard o’brien. this is him being awarded an honorary doctorate from the waikato institute of technology a few weeks ago, in new zealand.

let’s just stop for a moment and talk about this….i mean…

HOW FUCKING AWESOME IS THIS MAN?

 

 

He really is.

Review: Shock Treatment (1981)

Fans of The Rocky Horror Picture Show are bugnuts crazy. I know, I’ve seen it over 500 times, and performed in shadowcasts for well over half of those. I own gold lamé swim trunks.

So when word came out there was going to be a sequel in 1981, there was furor. Well, a quiet furor, because outside the theaters, these people tended to keep to themselves. But nonetheless.

Richard O’Brien created Shock Treatment, described cagily on the DVD commentary track as “Not a sequel, not a prequel, but an equal.”

It’s a parallel universe where Denton, USA, home of happy, square Brad and Janet Majors, has been turned into the world’s first reality TV show.

Remember, this was 1981. Reality TV didn’t really start until the 1988 Writers Guild of America strike, and such worthy artworks as COPS. In Shock Treatment, the whole town lives in the studio, and your personal cachet is based entirely on whether you’re in a show or not. Prizes include sponsored merchandise and being on other shows. The hospital, in fact, is a medical drama show called Dentonvale, and baffled, square Brad winds up on the show after winning/losing on the game show Marriage Maze, hosted by Dame Edna (Barry Humphries) in drag, playing the blind, Teutonic Bert Shnick.

The DTV network has its own Charles Foster Kane, in the form of the shadowy, manipulative and alliterative Farley Flavors. It was he that got Brad and Janet onto Marriage Maze, it was he that got Brad committed to Dentonvale hospital, it was he that caused dreary, square Janet Majors to become a star, the “It” girl of his new Faith Factory Show.

Janet, for her part, is babmoozled by fame, and soon forgets Brad, gets hooked on pills, and goes egomaniacal. Meanwhile all the relatively-level-headed townsfolk are getting their shows canceled. The toadlike Judge Oliver Wright (played by Charles "The Criminologist with no neck" Gray from Rocky Horror) and the simpering Betty Hapschatt (“Just a day ago she was palin old Betty Monroe!”) do some backstage sleuthing and discover Flavors’s secret: he and Brad are long-lost identical twins. Then they stage a daring escape and coup.

So, you know, it’s your typical story, as old as time: Boy wants Girl, Boy frames Girl’s husband, Boy has Husband committed, Girl becomes famous, Girl becomes an egomaniac, Husband discovers Boy is long-lost twin brother, Boy and Husband have a musical showdown…

…Boy loses, and Girl and Husband escape — along with punk band, a newscaster and a judge.

All with ridiculous costumes, plot twists, and the silliest songs you can imagine.

Not The Rocky Horror Picture Show, but fun nonetheless. It’s got many nods to Rocky, and some of the songs were originally written for an unproduced sequel (Look up Revenge of the Old Queen some time), so some of the lyrics may seem confusing, as far as the story goes, and some costumes, actors and characters will be familiar to Rocky fans.

Incidentally, there is exactly one actor in both movies who portrays the same role: Jeremy Newson plays Ralph Hapschatt, a man who has one or two lines in Rocky, comes back to Denton as the smarmiest man alive.

Jessica "Phantom of the Paradise" Harper pulls off a surprisingly complex Janet, and Cliff DeYoung as Brad and Farley is actually quite genius. It took me a while to recognize them as the same actor, so clearly did he differentiate the two characters’ voices, styles, postures … and hairstyles.

It’s a bit of a critique of the TV-ifying of the world, and it predicted Big Brother and The Truman Show quite presciently, but it’s never preachy. With O’Brien, as with David Lynch and John Waters, he loves his weirdos.

"You need a bit of, Ooh! Shock Treatment!"

Watch it with a friend. And a drink. Or two.

Scott “Scix” Maddix

written for Film Pipe.

Shock Treatment (1981), a follow-up to the film The Rocky Horror Picture Show — “Not a sequel, not a prequel, but an equal.” Written by Richard O’Brien, directed by Jim Sharman,  and starring Jessica Harper, Cliff De Young as Brad Majors, Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, and Barry Humphries as Bert Schnick.

Video clip of all the slides.

Shock Treatment (1981), a follow-up to the film The Rocky Horror Picture Show — “Not a sequel, not a prequel, but an equal.” Written by Richard O’Brien, directed by Jim Sharman,  and starring Jessica Harper, Cliff De Young as Brad Majors, Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, and Barry Humphries as Bert Schnick.

The sun never sets on those who ride into it.
Shock Treatment (1981), a follow-up to the film The Rocky Horror Picture Show — “Not a sequel, not a prequel, but an equal.” Written by Richard O’Brien, directed by Jim Sharman,  and starring Jessica Harper, Cliff De Young as Brad Majors, Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, and Barry Humphries as Bert Schnick.

The sun never sets on those who ride into it.

Shock Treatment (1981), a follow-up to the film The Rocky Horror Picture Show — “Not a sequel, not a prequel, but an equal.” Written by Richard O’Brien, directed by Jim Sharman,  and starring Jessica Harper, Cliff De Young as Brad Majors, Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, and Barry Humphries as Bert Schnick.


Audience become happy inmates of the asylum.
Shock Treatment (1981), a follow-up to the film The Rocky Horror Picture Show — “Not a sequel, not a prequel, but an equal.” Written by Richard O’Brien, directed by Jim Sharman,  and starring Jessica Harper, Cliff De Young as Brad Majors, Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, and Barry Humphries as Bert Schnick.

Audience become happy inmates of the asylum.

Shock Treatment (1981), a follow-up to the film The Rocky Horror Picture Show — “Not a sequel, not a prequel, but an equal.” Written by Richard O’Brien, directed by Jim Sharman,  and starring Jessica Harper, Cliff De Young as Brad Majors, Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, and Barry Humphries as Bert Schnick.

Well, the best thing you could ever do is die!
Shock Treatment (1981), a follow-up to the film The Rocky Horror Picture Show — “Not a sequel, not a prequel, but an equal.” Written by Richard O’Brien, directed by Jim Sharman,  and starring Jessica Harper, Cliff De Young as Brad Majors, Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, and Barry Humphries as Bert Schnick.

Well, the best thing you could ever do is die!

Shock Treatment (1981), a follow-up to the film The Rocky Horror Picture Show — “Not a sequel, not a prequel, but an equal.” Written by Richard O’Brien, directed by Jim Sharman,  and starring Jessica Harper, Cliff De Young as Brad Majors, Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, and Barry Humphries as Bert Schnick.

Who are you, sir?
Your twin brother and your accuser!
Shock Treatment (1981), a follow-up to the film The Rocky Horror Picture Show — “Not a sequel, not a prequel, but an equal.” Written by Richard O’Brien, directed by Jim Sharman,  and starring Jessica Harper, Cliff De Young as Brad Majors, Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, and Barry Humphries as Bert Schnick.

Who are you, sir?

Your twin brother and your accuser!

Shock Treatment (1981), a follow-up to the film The Rocky Horror Picture Show — “Not a sequel, not a prequel, but an equal.” Written by Richard O’Brien, directed by Jim Sharman,  and starring Jessica Harper, Cliff De Young as Brad Majors, Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, and Barry Humphries as Bert Schnick.

I spent a lifetime on deposit, and that’s a long time in the closet!
So if you say to me, “How was it?”
It was hard takin’ that heart-breakin’ godforsaken route
and I’m — ba ba ba ba-ba! Breakin’ out!
Shock Treatment (1981), a follow-up to the film The Rocky Horror Picture Show — “Not a sequel, not a prequel, but an equal.” Written by Richard O’Brien, directed by Jim Sharman,  and starring Jessica Harper, Cliff De Young as Brad Majors, Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, and Barry Humphries as Bert Schnick.

I spent a lifetime on deposit, and that’s a long time in the closet!

So if you say to me, “How was it?”

It was hard takin’ that heart-breakin’ godforsaken route

and I’m — ba ba ba ba-ba! Breakin’ out!

Shock Treatment (1981), a follow-up to the film The Rocky Horror Picture Show — “Not a sequel, not a prequel, but an equal.” Written by Richard O’Brien, directed by Jim Sharman,  and starring Jessica Harper, Cliff De Young as Brad Majors, Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, and Barry Humphries as Bert Schnick.

Look what I did, to my id!
Shock Treatment (1981), a follow-up to the film The Rocky Horror Picture Show — “Not a sequel, not a prequel, but an equal.” Written by Richard O’Brien, directed by Jim Sharman,  and starring Jessica Harper, Cliff De Young as Brad Majors, Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, and Barry Humphries as Bert Schnick.

Look what I did, to my id!

Shock Treatment (1981), a follow-up to the film The Rocky Horror Picture Show — “Not a sequel, not a prequel, but an equal.” Written by Richard O’Brien, directed by Jim Sharman,  and starring Jessica Harper, Cliff De Young as Brad Majors, Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, and Barry Humphries as Bert Schnick.