scixual:

City’s flames reflected in the eye (animated gif)
Blade Runner (1982) directed by Ridley Scott, starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos, M. Emmet Walsh, Daryl Hannah, William Sanderson, Brion James, Joe Turkel, Joanna Cassidy, James Hong, Morgan Paull, Kevin Thompson. Based Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick.

scixual:

City’s flames reflected in the eye (animated gif)

Blade Runner (1982) directed by Ridley Scott, starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos, M. Emmet Walsh, Daryl Hannah, William Sanderson, Brion James, Joe Turkel, Joanna Cassidy, James Hong, Morgan Paull, Kevin Thompson. Based Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick.

moviesincolor:

Request Week 4 – regularbasisBlade Runner, 1982Cinematography: Jordan Cronenweth

moviesincolor:

Request Week 4regularbasis
Blade Runner, 1982
Cinematography: Jordan Cronenweth

Movie posters with the titles of the books they were based on: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep / Blade Runner, Oil! / There Will Be Blood, The Short-Timers / Full Metal Jacket, Heart of Darkness / Apocalypse Now!, Monkey Planet / Planet of the Apes, We Can Remember It For You Wholesale / Total Recall

nevver:

Have you read the book?

cinemamonamour:

Daryl Hannah as Pris in Blade Runner (1982)

According to production designer Lawrence Paull, her punk outfits and make-up were inspired by a new wave calendar: “In late 1980, all of us threw a Christmas party in the art department,” Paull explains. “There were presents scattered everywhere. One was a wonderful calender of air-brushed, stylized portraits of new wave fashions - heavy rouge, different hair colors, features and clothes heavily accented. Sometime later Ridley stumbled across that calender and asked if he could borrow it for awhile. It wasn’t long before he had his head together with Charles Knode, who is one of the most resourceful costume designers I’ve ever met. The punk look then became the style for Pris and for some of the background extras on the street.”

(via drauh)

Lovely Blade Runner fanart.

lazymercenary:

Eduardo Risso - Bladerunner

(via feigenbaumsworld)

Blade Runner just keeps showing up on my feeds.

This animation is made of 3285 aquarelle paintings and form the very beginning of my paraphrase on the motion picture Blade Runner (1982) by Ridley Scott.

Blade Runner recreated in watercolors. Interesting project by Anders Ramsell.

Blade Runner (1982) directed by Ridley Scott, starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos, M. Emmet Walsh, Daryl Hannah, William Sanderson, Brion James, Joe Turkel, Joanna Cassidy, James Hong, Morgan Paull, Kevin Thompson. Based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick.

Pulp Cover Make-Overs: Blade Runner
wilwheaton:

darklyeuphoric:

thepostercollective:
Sci-Fi Film Favorites Get Pulp Cover Make-Overs

Pulp Cover Make-Overs are the best thing since ever. 
I want Pulp Cover Make-Overs for every movie or book I’ve ever been part of, because of reasons.

Pulp Cover Make-Overs: Blade Runner

wilwheaton:

darklyeuphoric:

thepostercollective:

Sci-Fi Film Favorites Get Pulp Cover Make-Overs

Pulp Cover Make-Overs are the best thing since ever. 

I want Pulp Cover Make-Overs for every movie or book I’ve ever been part of, because of reasons.

REVIEW: Whew! This one took a while. It’s so visually iconic, I wound up taking over 800 screenshots. I whittled it down to 242. I’ll try to control myself better next time.
Phillip K. Dick was a loony-toons writer, but he had a creative and wondrous flavor of loony-toonicity that gave rise to mind-warping tales that leave the reader questioning the very nature of reality and identity.
Smack dab in the middle of this oeuvre is Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, the novel that Blade Runner is based on. It raises questions on the nature of consciousness: can an artificial being be a real person? What if it has feelings? What if it doesn’t even know it is an android? How is ending the life of such a creation morally different from ending the life of a human being? Would a society that invented and used such beings be different from slavers? Would the difficulties and turmoil of a slave-based culture be the same?
It is set in the near future, on a somewhat dystopian Earth whose population is decimated by off-world emigration, leaving only the poor and sick behind, along with those that profit from them. Harrison Ford plays Rick Deckard, a sort of bounty hunter who specializes in hunting these androids, known by the trade name Replicants.
A quartet of off-world Replicants have come to Earth, pretending to be human, in search of answers. Most notably: how can they extend their lives beyond the built-in expiration date they were designed with?
Deckard’s heart is not in it. They seem to be a metaphor for his own failing life, but he hunts them anyway — and the strongest of them hunt him in return, until it becomes a showdown on the roofs of the city of Los Angeles.
Stylistically, this film is iconic. Anything cyberpunk, anything in a dark, messy dystopian future, owes much to Ridley Scott’s creation.
Speaking of Ridley Scott, Do you suppose this could be the same world as Alien? We see the spacefarers, but don’t spend much time on the streets of Earth seeing what it’s like for those left behind. I think it could be. 

This is Scix in the Back Row, taking the Voight-Kampff test.
Blade Runner (1982) directed by Ridley Scott, starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos, M. Emmet Walsh, Daryl Hannah, William Sanderson, Brion James, Joe Turkel, Joanna Cassidy, James Hong, Morgan Paull, Kevin Thompson. Based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick.

REVIEW: Whew! This one took a while. It’s so visually iconic, I wound up taking over 800 screenshots. I whittled it down to 242. I’ll try to control myself better next time.

Phillip K. Dick was a loony-toons writer, but he had a creative and wondrous flavor of loony-toonicity that gave rise to mind-warping tales that leave the reader questioning the very nature of reality and identity.

Smack dab in the middle of this oeuvre is Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, the novel that Blade Runner is based on. It raises questions on the nature of consciousness: can an artificial being be a real person? What if it has feelings? What if it doesn’t even know it is an android? How is ending the life of such a creation morally different from ending the life of a human being? Would a society that invented and used such beings be different from slavers? Would the difficulties and turmoil of a slave-based culture be the same?

It is set in the near future, on a somewhat dystopian Earth whose population is decimated by off-world emigration, leaving only the poor and sick behind, along with those that profit from them. Harrison Ford plays Rick Deckard, a sort of bounty hunter who specializes in hunting these androids, known by the trade name Replicants.

A quartet of off-world Replicants have come to Earth, pretending to be human, in search of answers. Most notably: how can they extend their lives beyond the built-in expiration date they were designed with?

Deckard’s heart is not in it. They seem to be a metaphor for his own failing life, but he hunts them anyway — and the strongest of them hunt him in return, until it becomes a showdown on the roofs of the city of Los Angeles.

Stylistically, this film is iconic. Anything cyberpunk, anything in a dark, messy dystopian future, owes much to Ridley Scott’s creation.

Speaking of Ridley Scott, Do you suppose this could be the same world as Alien? We see the spacefarers, but don’t spend much time on the streets of Earth seeing what it’s like for those left behind. I think it could be.

This is Scix in the Back Row, taking the Voight-Kampff test.

Blade Runner (1982) directed by Ridley Scott, starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos, M. Emmet Walsh, Daryl Hannah, William Sanderson, Brion James, Joe Turkel, Joanna Cassidy, James Hong, Morgan Paull, Kevin Thompson. Based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick.

"Rachael?"

"It’s too bad she won’t live. But then again, who does?"

Blade Runner (1982) directed by Ridley Scott, starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos, M. Emmet Walsh, Daryl Hannah, William Sanderson, Brion James, Joe Turkel, Joanna Cassidy, James Hong, Morgan Paull, Kevin Thompson. Based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick.

"It’s too bad she won’t live. But then again, who does?"

Blade Runner (1982) directed by Ridley Scott, starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos, M. Emmet Walsh, Daryl Hannah, William Sanderson, Brion James, Joe Turkel, Joanna Cassidy, James Hong, Morgan Paull, Kevin Thompson. Based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick.

"You’ve done a man’s job, sir. I guess you’re through, huh?"

"Finished."

Blade Runner (1982) directed by Ridley Scott, starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos, M. Emmet Walsh, Daryl Hannah, William Sanderson, Brion James, Joe Turkel, Joanna Cassidy, James Hong, Morgan Paull, Kevin Thompson. Based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick.

"Time to die." (animated gif)

Blade Runner (1982) directed by Ridley Scott, starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos, M. Emmet Walsh, Daryl Hannah, William Sanderson, Brion James, Joe Turkel, Joanna Cassidy, James Hong, Morgan Paull, Kevin Thompson. Based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick.

"All those moments will be lost in time like tears in rain."

Blade Runner (1982) directed by Ridley Scott, starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos, M. Emmet Walsh, Daryl Hannah, William Sanderson, Brion James, Joe Turkel, Joanna Cassidy, James Hong, Morgan Paull, Kevin Thompson. Based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick.

"I’ve … seen things you people wouldn’t believe. Attack ships off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate."

Blade Runner (1982) directed by Ridley Scott, starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos, M. Emmet Walsh, Daryl Hannah, William Sanderson, Brion James, Joe Turkel, Joanna Cassidy, James Hong, Morgan Paull, Kevin Thompson. Based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick.

"Quite an experience to live in fear, isn’t it? That’s what it is to be a slave."

Blade Runner (1982) directed by Ridley Scott, starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos, M. Emmet Walsh, Daryl Hannah, William Sanderson, Brion James, Joe Turkel, Joanna Cassidy, James Hong, Morgan Paull, Kevin Thompson. Based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick.