britishfilminstitute:

How Kate Bush embraced the dark side of cinema, with a little help from The Shining. http:.

Wow.

britishfilminstitute:

How Kate Bush embraced the dark side of cinema, with a little help from The Shining.

Wow.

(via fuckyesbritishcinema)

the-overlook-hotel:

A deleted scene from an early screenplay for The Shining, dated February 4, 1978. In this scene, Jack finds a scrapbook which chronicles the Overlook Hotel’s sordid history. Jack becomes obsessed with the scrapbook, then shares his discovery with Wendy.

The scrapbook, which figures prominently in Stephen King’s novel, was all but removed in the final cut of the film. However, many scenes involving the scrapbook were filmed but not used, including this scene from a later draft.

(Many thanks to David Winter for sharing this screenplay. His grandfather, Derek Winter, was a manager at Stansted Airport, which was used as the location for Dick Hallorann’s phone call to Larry Durkin. The screenplay was given to him by Kubrick so he could read the story and approve the use of the airport as a location.)

welcometomagicalmysterytour:

The Art Of Close-up 

featuring Edgar Wright 

Neat look at the Cornetto Trilogy

(via thecornettotrilogy)

menrath:

Twin Peaks

Nice art … love the style.

menrath:

Twin Peaks

Nice art … love the style.

Twin Peaks 25 Years Later Countdown

Countdown to 03-25-2014.

I'll see you agai in 25 years.

nevver:

“… it’s always February 2nd and there’s nothing I can do about it.”

nevver:

“… it’s always February 2nd and there’s nothing I can do about it.”

(Source: nevver.com)

nudityandnerdery:

saunteringvaguelydownwards:

cabinlocked:

tennants-hair:

doctorharleenfrancisquinnzel:

tennants-hair:

treemouse9145:

bibliotaphing:

tennants-hair:

that show with the gay guys who won’t admit they’re gay for each other

today on guess the fandom

You’ll have to narrow it down plz

okay fine the one where we like the bad guy

You’re gonna have to narrow it a bit more than that

alright the one where there’s a guy who died but not really

You’re gonna have to narrow it a bit more than that.

Oh come on, you know who I mean, those two white guys, one has the short spiky hair, the other has black hair…

The one where the show seems to keep playing at the idea of a gay relationship, but the people behind the show laugh and dismiss the idea in a manner that is insulting at times?

The one where women and POC tend to die or disappear at a disproportionate rate…


Rosemary’s Baby (1968)

ALL OF THEM WITCHES

Rosemary’s Baby (1968)

ALL OF THEM WITCHES

(Source: vintagegal, via trudymade)

Reblog if you love to write.

Whether it be fanfiction, original stories, drabbles, songs, poems, books, or anything that has to do with creative words, then reblog. Let’s gather all the writers of Tumblr together.

(Source: insaneandproudofit, via harmonyinkpress)

Yes, good, I have had similar thoughts.

Yes, good, I have had similar thoughts.

(Source: twinpeakssecrets, via twinpeakssecrets)

(Source: madamefrankreich, via techsgtjenn)

[Minecraft]

Guise! Guise! I made neato planters! …

…though the wooden ones (boats) are rather unstable.

the-overlook-hotel:

In the first scene with Danny and Wendy at their Denver, Colorado apartment, a toy laser pistol can be seen lying on the table. This prop is the last remnant of an early idea director Stanley Kubrick had for The Shining.

These pages from a recently uncovered draft of the screenplay from 1978 offer a glimpse into this abandoned idea.

The first page, dated 3/20/78, contains an unused beginning of the lunchtime scene — it was either never filmed, or removed during editing. Kubrick’s hand-written note reads “We see on the table alongside him his space laser gun which will always be with him”.

On the second page, dated 2/4/78, Kubrick describes the final showdown in the maze. The action had yet to be fully worked out, although he does have Jack getting trapped in the maze and freezing to death. Danny, however, does not walk backwards in his own footsteps to cunningly elude Jack. Instead, he uses an implement to systematically smash all the lights in the maze, plunging it into darkness as he follows his own tracks back out of the maze.

In a subsequent draft, Kubrick has Danny using the above mentioned toy laser gun, which is shown to have a flashlight built into it, to light his way out of the dark maze.

The second page also offers a glimpse into an earlier version of the ending, where Dick Hallorann is not killed by Jack, but instead shows up to save Danny and Wendy — an ending which is more closely aligned with Stephen King’s novel. Earlier treatments had Wendy killing Jack with a knife, and when Hallorann shows up at the hotel, it’s revealed that he’s been called to the Overlook to do the hotel’s bidding; he’s intent on finishing the job of killing Wendy and Danny.

Interestingly, Danny is referred to as “Tony” in the screenplay for the last third of the story, after he becomes catatonic following his encounter with the woman in Room 237. 

(Many thanks to David Winter for sharing this screenplay. His grandfather, Derek Winter, was a manager at Stansted Airport, which was used as the location for Dick Hallorann’s phone call to Larry Durkin. The screenplay was given to him by Kubrick so he could read the story and approve the use of the airport as a location.)

Writing Advice

A C: I am trying to find the answer to How do I write a novel too!! plenty of ideas… no clue how to do it… classes locally??? any advice?

Scott Maddix: Well, personally, I have already written one, have a manuscript for another, and strong beginnings for a third. When I am not in depression, writing is a great joy to me, and often a way to put myself in a good mood. Something I look forward to.

For me: I’d take some creative writing courses, if you don’t feel confident about your skill, sure, but READ a lot, and WRITE a lot. As three-edged-sword says above, the key is to find what it takes to JUST DO IT.

For me, the sort of breakthrough moment was the year I did NaNoWriMo, determined to simply make as many words as needed. I wrote thousands of short scraps of stories. Out of those, a few fully-developed short stories arose. I collected the best of them into Chunnel Surfer II.

With the confidence of a few short stories, I then felt like I could tackle a larger story, and wrote Patchworld (that’s the manuscript), a more traditional novel. Still needs a significant edit, and that’s a whole other set of skills. That’s what the classes are going to be good for. But for the writing, Just Do It is actually, yes, the best advice. Give yourself permission to write crap, put words on the page, even if you’re writing laundry lists or copying out books, it’ll get your brain and your fingers used to the task. Write things in the “wrong” format: poetry, screenplay, interoffice memo, video game script. Practice writing in the style of your favorite authors, as well as writers you don’t like so much. Then as it gets comfortable, start to segue into writing complete stories.

For every completed/published work, I’d say most writers have thousands of false starts, scraps, scribbled ideas on the back of napkins.

I also like to keep an “ideas” file, where I keep those napkins, pictures from magazines, news articles, etc. So if there’s a lull in my creative outflow, I can sort of browse through and get ideas, maybe pick two or three unrelated things and try to imagine a story that includes all of them.

Ask yourself “what if…” a lot.

Read a lot.

Have lots of experiences. Watch movies. Go to the mall and eavesdrop. Spend a day at the park watching people, imagining backstories based on their clothes and how they walk.

Have friends willing to read your stuff in its raw form and give you feedback — but be sure to allow yourself to ignore it! But still, it is useful and important to LISTEN to your first readers. If you find one that is really good at analysis and feedback, who won’t just say, “it’s great, honey!” — hang onto them. They are precious.

Read some more.

In a few weeks, or months, I’ll be able to get back on that horse, but for now I can only want to want it, and wait.

brudesworld:

Spirited Away (2001)

brudesworld:

Spirited Away (2001)

(Source: joannawakefield)